Texas counties remain GOP strongholds

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Note: Percentages and numbers are subject to change, the outcomes of these races are not expected to shift. These races were called by Decision Desk HQ, a non-partisan organization that provides election results and data.

Federal, State races

The Associated Press has called the race in Texas for president in favor of incumbent Donald Trump (R), giving him the state’s 38 electoral votes.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, Trump received 52.21 percent of the vote while former Vice President Joe Biden (D) received 46.37 percent of the vote.

Republican incumbent U.S. Representative for Texas District 14 Randy Weber won reelection over Democratic challenger Adrienne Bell with 61.7 percent of the vote. Texas’ 14th congressional district encompasses parts of Brazoria County, all of Galveston County and all of Jefferson County.

Brian Babin (R) won reelection to the U.S. House Texas District 36 over challenger Rashad Lewis (D) with 73.6 percent of the vote. Texas’s 36th congressional district encompasses all of Chambers, Hardin, Jasper, Liberty, Newton, Orange, Polk and Tyler counties and a small portion of Harris County.

Incumbent state senator of Texas Senate District 4 Brandon Creighton (R) won reelection over opponent Jay Stittleburg (D) with 84.3 percent of the vote. Texas Senate District 4 encompasses all of Chambers and Jefferson counties, a small portion of Galveston and Harris counties, and a majority of Montgomery County.

In Texas House District 19, incumbent James White (R) ran for reelection unopposed and received 72,262 votes. Texas House District 19 encompasses all of Hardin, Jasper, Newton, Polk and Tyler counties.

Incumbent Dade Phelan (R) also ran unopposed for Texas House District 21 and received 65,648 votes. Texas House District 21 encompasses some of Jefferson County and all of Orange County. 

In Texas House District 22, incumbent Joe Deshotel (D) won reelection over challenger Jacorion Randle (R) with 68.3 percent of the vote. Texas House District 22 encompasses a majority of Jefferson County. 

Incumbent Mayes Middleton (R) won reelection over Jeff Antonelli (D) to Texas House District 23 with 60.3 percent of the vote. Texas House District 23 encompasses all of Chambers County and some of Galveston County. 

Statewide, voters chose the winners of Railroad Commissioner, Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice, Supreme Court Places 6, 7 and 8, and Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Places 3, 4 and 9.

Republicans managed to win all eight spots. Jim Wright (R) beat out Chrysta Castañeda (D) with 53.2 percent of the votes for Railroad Commissioner. There are three seats on the Railroad Commission board which governs the Texas oil and gas industry — all three are held by Republicans.  

Incumbent Nathan Hecht (R) was elected as Texas Supreme Court Justice over Amy Clark Meachum (D) with 53.1 percent of the vote. Texas Supreme Court Place 6 went to incumbent Jane Bland (R) over Kathy Cheng (D) with 55.5 percent of the vote. Place 7 went to incumbent Jeffrey S. Boyd (R) over Staci Williams (D) with 53.5 percent of the vote and Place 8 went to incumbent Brett Busby (R) over Gisela D. Triana (D) with 53.6 percent of the vote. No Democrat has been elected to a seat on the Texas Supreme Court since 1994.

Bert Richardson (R) won reelection to the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Place 3 over Elizabeth Davis Frizell (D) with 54.8 percent of the vote. Place 4 went to incumbent Kevin Yeary (R) over Tina Clinton (D) with 55 percent of the vote and Place 9 went to incumbent David Newell (R) over Brandon Birmingham (D) with 55.5 percent of the vote. Like the Texas Supreme Court, Texas’s Court of Criminal Appeals has not seen a Democrat elected to it since 1994. 

Jefferson County races

Incumbent Jefferson County Sheriff Zena Stephens (D) defeated challenger David Odom (R) in the Nov. 3 election with 53.16 percent of the vote. 

Stephens, who was first elected sheriff in 2016, is Texas’ first Black female sheriff, and is one of only two in the nation. 

Vernon Pierce (R) defeated write-in candidate Marinette Landry Parkerson with 95.53 percent of the vote for County Commissioner, Pct. 1.

County Constable, Pct. 1 went to Jevonne “J.C.” Pollard (D) with 54.71 percent of the vote over opponent Mark Mann (R).

Richard Beaumont defeated Mike Cabaniss with 63.7 percent of the vote for Jefferson County Drainage District 7 Commissioner, Groves. Jefferson County Drainage District 7 Commissioner, Port Neches went to Matt Vincent who defeated opponents Eric Adams, Jim Parson and Rand Holtam with 49.5 percent of the vote. 

Celeste Ramsey won Place 1 on the Hamshire-Fannett ISD board of trustees over Brandon Luquette and Eugene Arceneaux with 35.3 percent of the vote. Place 3 on the Hamshire-Fannett ISD board of trustees went to Mike Broussard over Chad McLeod and Joseph Schwartzenburg with 68.8 percent of the vote. Bob Thewman defeated Davilyn Walston with 62.2 percent of the vote for Place 4 on the Hamshire-Fannett ISD board of trustees. Place 6 went to Robertt Lott over Felman Malveaux with 52.5 percent of the vote. 

Dallon James was elected to Place 6 of the Port Neches-Groves ISD board of trustees over Rusty Brittain with 43.8 percent of the vote. Joseph L. Guillory II was elected to the Port Arthur ISD school board over Kenneth Lofton and Dianne Brown with 36.7 percent of the vote. 

Hamshire-Fannett ISD voted in favor of a $36.9 million bond that would go towards improving Hamshire-Fannett High School through new constructions, renovations, etc. The proposition passed with 52 percent of the vote. Hamshire-Fannett ISD voted against the second $1.48 million bond that proposed building a new concession stand and restrooms with 56 percent of the vote. 

A historically Democratic county, Jefferson County voted again for Trump over Joe Biden with 50.21 percent of the vote going to Trump and 48.62 percent going to Biden. In 2016, Jefferson County voted narrowly for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton — the first time a Republican candidate won the county since 1972. 

Jefferson County also helped incumbent U.S. Senator John Cornyn (R) win his fourth term over Democratic challenger MJ Hegar. Cornyn received 50.51 percent of the vote compared to Hegar who received 47.46 percent.

The county favored Randy Weber over Adrienne Bell for U.S. House District 14 Representative with 52.16 percent of the vote, a lower percentage than the statewide average.

Jefferson County voted for the Republican candidate for every statewide race.

Jefferson County reported a total of 95,375 ballots cast in this election out of a total of 150,690 registered voters — equaling a 63.29 percent voter turnout rate. According to jeffersonelections.com, there was a 59.52 percent voter turnout for the 2016 general election. 

Early voting turnout was nine points higher in 2020 than in 2016 with approximately 88.23 percent of the county’s total votes being cast before Election Day. 

Orange County

Note: Orange County reported their votes in exact numbers and not percentages like the aforementioned counties.

Incumbent Paul Burch won reelection to the Orange City At-Large seat over Charles Ray Thomas with 3,417 votes.

Larry E. Ancelot Jr defeated J.B. Arrington for Orange County Drainage Pct. 2 with 6,153 votes. James Scales defeated Randy Fuselier for Orange County Drainage Pct. 3 with 7,510 votes.

Dan Mohon was elected mayor of the city of Pinehurst with 444 votes over challenger Troy Pierce.

The Bridge City Council Place 2 seat went to Mike Reed with 2,290 votes over Kenneth Prosperie. Three candidates were elected Rose City Councilmembers At-Large — Tony Wilcoxson, Shelia Faske and Jeff Dom who received 98, 90 and 60 votes, respectively. 

Michael C. Johnson won Place 6 on the Bridge City School District board of trustees with 4,779 votes, defeating Keith A. Jones. Place 7 of the Bridge City School District board of trustees went to Mark Anderson who received 4,602 votes over Cory Mitchell.

Place 6 of the Orangefield ISD board of trustees went to Jude Graffagnino who received 2,821 votes. 

Orange County has voted for the Republican candidate for president in every election since 2000 — a trend that was repeated in this election cycle. President Donald Trump (R) received 81.09 percent of the vote over Joe Biden (D) who received 17.66 percent of the vote. 

The county also stuck with Sen. John Cornyn over MJ Hegar for Texas’s U.S. Senate seat; Cornyn received 52.72 percent of the vote compared to Hegar’s 11.47 percent. The county also voted for incumbent Brian Babin for their U.S. House representative with 53.8 percent of the vote over Rashad Lewis. The county also voted majority Republican for every statewide race.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, Orange County cast 35,974 votes in the 2020 general election out of 54,442 registered voters, equaling a 66.08 percent voter turnout rate. This is up from the 60.05 percent turnout rate in 2016. 

Early voting turnout was 12.79 points higher in 2020 with approximately 84.26 percent of the county’s total votes being cast before Election Day. 

Hardin County

Hardin-Jefferson ISD (which covers parts of both Hardin and Jefferson counties) voters approved two bonds totaling $25 million. The propositions called for construction and renovations, etc. for school building and the Hardin-Jefferson High School stadium, among other things. Proposition A passed with 68 percent of the vote in favor and Proposition B passed with 64 percent of the vote in favor of the bond.

Amanda Young (R) was elected as Hardin County Commissioner Pct. 3 over Donald Owens (D) with 88 percent of the vote. 

Lauren Caywood Rothe was elected to Trustee Position 2 for Lumberton ISD with 51 percent of the vote over Patrick Bell.

Jason McDonald was elected to Trustee Place 4 of Kountze ISD over Christopher Jones with 53 percent of the vote. Missy Jennings beat out Joyce Bottley for Trustee Place 5 of Kountze ISD with 53 percent of the vote. Trustee Place 7 went to Steve Eppes over Rachael Coe with 51 percent of the vote.

Farrah Brown Hashaw was elected to West Hardin CCISD Position 5 over Carl Price and Calvin Skinner with 55 percent of the vote.

Hardin County has voted for the Republican candidate for president in every election since 1996 and continued to do so in 2020. The county voted 86.39 percent for Donald Trump and 12.52 percent for Joe Biden. 

The majority of Hardin County also voted for Republican Sen. John Cornyn with 58.74 percent of the vote over MJ Hegar who received 8.42 percent. 

For every statewide race, the county voted in the majority for the Republican candidate.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, Hardin County cast 27,555 votes in the 2020 general election out of 39,952 registered voters, equaling a 68.97 percent voter turnout rate. This is up from the 59.67 percent turnout rate in 2016.

Early voting was 18.61 points higher in 2020 with approximately 82.34 percent of the county’s total votes being cast before Election Day. 

Chambers County

Tracy Elizabeth Christopher (R) was elected Chief Justice of 14th Court of Appeals District over Jane Robinson (D) with 56.27 percent of the vote. Place 7 of the 14th Court of Appeals District went to Ken Wise (R) with 56.28 percent of the vote over Tamika Craft (D).

Place 3 of the 1st Court of Appeals District went to Russell Lloyd (R) with 55.79 percent of the vote over Veronica Rivas-Molloy (D). Place 5 of the court went to Terry Adams (R) with 56.05 percent of the vote over Amparo Monique Guerra (D).

Carlton D. Carrington beat out Lane Bertrand for Anahuac ISD Trustee, Position 3 with 64.27 percent of the vote. 

Leslie Turner defeated opponents Mike Emmons, Geraldine Brown and Michael Manders for Chambers County Public Hospital District 1 Board Member At-Large with 40.27 percent of the vote. 

Gregg Turner was elected Trinity Bay Conservation District Director, Precinct 4 with 73.57 percent of the vote over Loretta Emmons. 

Nathan Trahan defeated Danny Thompson for City of Anahuac Alderman, Position 5 with 54.44 percent of the vote. 

Taylor Wilcox received 62.71 percent of the vote for East Chambers ISD Trustee, Position 1 over Patrick A. Denton. 

Chambers County has not voted for the Democratic candidate for president since 1976; the streak continued into 2020. Donald Trump received 80.14 percent of the vote whereas Joe Biden received 18.47 percent.

U.S. Texas Sen. John Cornyn received a majority of votes in Chambers County with 55.45 percent compared to MJ Hegar who received 12.33 percent.

For every statewide race, the county voted in the majority for the Republican candidate.

According to the Texas Secretary of State, Chambers County cast 21,641 votes in the 2020 general election out of 30,709 registered voters, equaling a 70.47 percent voter turnout rate. This is up from the 62.07 percent voter turnout rate in 2016. 

Early voting was 13.65 points higher in 2020 with approximately 87.13 percent of the county’s total votes being cast before Election Day.

Liberty County

Note: Liberty County reported their votes in exact numbers and not percentages like the aforementioned counties. 

David Whitmire was elected County Commissioner, Precinct 3 with 4,274 votes over Barbara McIntyre.

Tammy Bishop was elected Constable, Precinct 1 over Martin Trahan with 2,676 votes.

Dwayne Stovall defeated Kevin Johnson for Tarkington ISD School Board Position 4 with 2,043 votes. Position 6 went to Cory Anderson with 2,320 votes over Marcus King. Position 7 went to Lane Gulledge with 2,713 votes over Nick Morrison. 

Eugene Thibodeaux Jr., Arthur Baines and Tony Scott were elected to the Raywood Drainage District with 155, 145 and 142 votes respectively.

Carly Sagar was elected to the Plum Grove City Council, Position 2 with 115 votes over Rhonda Willis. 

Coach Searles was elected to the Cleveland ISD, Board of Trustees Position 7 with 2,479 votes over Ronnie Lewis. 

The Cleveland City Council Position 3 when to James Franklin with 736 votes over Fred Terrell and Position 4 went to Dolores Terry with 852 votes over Mike Penry. 

Kellie Taylor was elected mayor of the City of Daisetta with 216 votes against Eric Thaxton and Renee McGee.

The City of Daisetta voted in favor of $2.12 million utility bonds with 200 votes.

The City of Daisetta, Alderman Position 1 went to Cindy Burchfield over Jimmy May with 277 votes. Position 2 went to Emily Shields who received 186 votes over Lori Tidwell. Position 3 went to Don Neyland with 190 votes over Benny Carroll and Raymond Williams. Position 5 went to Mike Parrish over Quinn Godwin with 263 votes. 

Hardin City Council Position 2 went to Dustin Vollert with 123 votes over Anthony Landry and Julie Terry. Position 3 went to Tommy Small with 150 votes over opponents Krystal Mobley and Rachael Smart. 

Donald McDaniel was elected to the Dayton City Council Position 1 with 1,299 votes over Wendell Null. John Headrick was elected to Position 5 over Alvin Burress with 1,589.

Lloyd Griffith was elected to Liberty ISD School Board Position 1 with 2,026 votes over Bruce George. 

David Arnold, Chipper Smith and Neal Thornton were elected to the City of Liberty City Council with 1,418, 1,140 and 752 votes, respectively.

Cornelius Gilmore was elected to Ames City Council Position 2 with 219 votes over Errol Andres. Barbara Lee Domain was elected to Position 4 over Eddie White with 251 votes.

Since 1996, Liberty County has voted for the Republican candidate for president in every election. Donald Trump received in 79.44 of the votes for president compared to Joe Biden who received 19.71 percent. 

U.S. TX Sen. John Cornyn received 49.25 of the vote for the Senate race whereas opponent MJ Hegar received 12.25 percent. 

For every statewide race, the county voted for the Republican candidate. 

According to the Texas Secretary of State, Liberty County cast 29,314 votes in the 2020 general election out of 46,155 registered voters, equaling a 63.51 percent voter turnout rate. This is up from the 55.29 percent voter turnout rate in 2016.

Early voting was 10.28 points higher in 2020 with approximately 77.64 percent of the county’s total votes being cast before Election Day. Visit sos.state.tx.us, or texastribune.org to see more information about Texas races.

Olivia Malick, UP editor

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